5230B Excavator Electronic Systems Guide Vital Information Management System (VIMS) Caterpillar


Vital Information Management System (VIMS)
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5230B Excavator Electronic Systems Guide [RENR3377]
ELECTRICAL AND STARTING SYSTEM
ELECTRONICS GP-MONITOR
5230B Excavator Electronic Systems Guide Location of Electronic Control Modules
5230B Excavator Electronic Systems Guide Vital Information Management System (VIMS)
1.1. Related Support Material



Illustration 1g00860098

Block diagram of the Vital Information Management System (VIMS)




Illustration 2g00822575

VIMS display components.

(1) Gauge cluster module

(2) Message center module

(3) Alert indicator

(4) Data logging indicator

(5) Gauges

(6) Message area

(7) Universal gauge

(8) Gauge warning area




Illustration 3g00822576

VIMS keypad module

(9) "Gauge" Key

(10) Key pressed indicator

(11) Backward arrow key

(12) Forward arrow key

The Vital Information Management System (VIMS) is a state-of-the-art onboard system. The VIMS has the features that are listed below:

  • Machine systems are monitored for the operator.

  • Abnormal machine conditions and/or incorrect operation of the machine are identified. The diagnosis of these abnormal conditions will allow the operator to modify the operation of the machine in order to correct the problem. The service technician is able to schedule maintenance for the machine if the condition is not related to the operation of the machine.

  • Prognostic information that can help predict potential problems before failures can occur. This allows the maintenance of the machine to be scheduled during the preventive maintenance servicing interval.

The components of the typical VIMS are listed below:

  • VIMS electronic control module

  • VIMS keypad Module

  • Display components

  • Switches

  • Sensors

  • Solenoids

  • Warning lamps

  • Warning alarm

Data Links

The VIMS communicates with other electronic controls on the machine and the VIMS communicates with systems off the machine through the data links. The five VIMS data links are listed below:

AVS Data Link - This two wire data link allows communication between the VIMS electronic control module and other machine control systems.

Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Data Link - This four wire data link allows communication between the VIMS electronic control module and all of the display components except the keypad.

Keypad Data Link - This two wire data link allows communication between the VIMS electronic control module and the keypad.

RS-232 Data Link (Service Tool) - This serial three wire data link allows communication between the VIMS electronic control module and the service tool (laptop computer).

RS-232 Data Link (Broadcast) - This serial three-wire data link allows communication between the VIMS electronic control module and other off board systems (non service tool). Onboard data can be passed from the machine hands free if a user supplied system such as radio telemetry is connected to this port.

Data

The Vital Information Management System uses four types of data. The four types of data are listed here:

Sensed - Data is read from the sensors and the switches. The sensors and the switches communicate with the VIMS electronic control module.

Internal - The data is generated within the VIMS electronic control module. The date and time are examples of internal data.

Communicated - The data is received through the AVS data link from other machine systems. For example, the engine speed is received through the AVS data link from the electronic engine control.

Calculated - Data mathematically determined by the VIMS electronic control module. For example, the event duration is calculated and stored in the event list.

Events

Table 1
VIMS EVENTS    
Data Event     Maintenance Event    
Filters     Open Sensor Circuits, etc.    
Temperature     Calibration    
Possible Machine Damage        
Performance (Payload)        
Location (GPS)        

The operator is alerted to the existence of all abnormal machine conditions by VIMS. All abnormal machine conditions are called data events. High ambient air temperature is an example of a data event. The operator is alerted to problems in the VIMS electronic control module and the other electronic modules on the machine. The electronic system failures are called a diagnostic type of maintenance events. The signal voltage of the hydraulic oil level sensor that is above normal is an example of a maintenance event. The stored information about the VIMS events is used to assist the service personnel. The service personnel use this information to perform the operations that are listed below: machine maintenance and troubleshoot the machine.

DATA events are related to a machine system. The operator needs to RESPOND to this event in most cases. For example, the operator needs to modify operation in order to cool the converter oil temperature when the temperature is too high. When such an event is present, pressing the "F1" key will show more information. The operator is shown additional information on the second line of the message center. During temperature warnings, the "F1" key will cause the display to show the actual temperature of the machine system.

MAINTENANCE events are related to electrical system problems. These events require a service technician to PERFORM SERVICE. When a diagnostic code is present, pressing the "F1" key will display the MID, the CID and the FMI. When a MID for a different system is displayed in place of a MID for VIMS, refer to the applicable Service Manual for that electronic control.

Note: Multiple events for a single machine condition may occur. The Vital Information Management System can determine if the actual cause of a stored event is due to a failed component or a true abnormal condition.

Feature Variations

The same VIMS operates on a variety of different machines. All the possible VIMS functions are not performed on every machine. Configuration software is used in order to identify the type of VIMS machine. The configuration software also identifies the available VIMS functions.

The quantity of VIMS display components and the type of available indications are listed here:

  • Quad gauge modules (1) are used to show changing machine conditions. Gauges (5) display information such as the temperature, the pressure and the level.

  • One alert indicator (3) per message center module shows that an event has been detected and the event is present.

  • Data logging indicator (4) on the message center module informs the service technician that the data logging function is active. The data logging indicator shows the service technician that the data logger was activated from the keypad.

  • One universal gauge (7) per message center module (2). The value of the parameter that is displayed on message area (6) will be indicated by the universal gauge.

  • One message area (6) per message center module. The parameter name, status and operator instructions are information that is displayed on the message area.

The type of indications and the quantity of indications that are used in the VIMS display area will vary according to the application. All the indications that are used in the VIMS display area may not be used on every machine. A machine may use one or two of the message center modules. In addition to the indications that are listed above, the action lamp and the action alarm indicate the severity (warning category) of a problem. The service indicator lamp alerts the service technician that an event has occurred. The service indicator lamp indicates that the event is present.

Diagnostic information is stored for all maintenance events even if the event is not present at the time of troubleshooting. A lap top personal computer (PC) is used as the VIMS service tool. Refer to the VIMSpc User Manual, FEB0047 for additional information.

Stored Data

The occurrence of certain VIMS events and real time machine conditions are recorded in onboard VIMS memory. The information is organized into seven categories. This information is used to analyze problems with the machine. The information can be used to forecast problems with the machine. The information is typically used at a later date by service technicians or management. The seven categories of information are listed here:

Event List/Summary List - The event list is a record of stored events that have occurred on the machine. Not all events are stored. The record contains the last 500 events that are listed in chronological order. This means that the events are listed in the order of occurrence. The newest events appear at the top of the list. The event list transfers the oldest data into the event summary list when the event list exceeds 500 records. The event summary list is composed of the first five occurrences, the last five occurrences and the worst five occurrences that are recorded for any of the data events. The event summary list is limited to storing only 500 records. Maintenance events can be identified by the diagnostic codes (MID, CID and FMI).

All other events are data events. The event list is accessible from the message center or with the service tool.

Note: All events that contain MID, CID and FMI information are the diagnostic type of maintenance events. Not all events without MID, CID and FMI information are data events. An example of a maintenance event without diagnostic codes is an open wire in the hydraulic oil level circuit. Remember that a 2-wire switch circuit (open switch) can report a true condition that relates to a parameter. This same 2-wire switch circuit can indicate a system failure (open wire) but the failure is reported as low hydraulic oil level.

Snapshot - The Snapshot stores a segment of history in real time for all parameters (channels) at a one second interval. The snapshot relates to a set of "predefined events". A snapshot is triggered automatically for a severe event. The snapshot is then stored in memory. The configuration software designates the events that are considered to be severe events. The keypad can be used to initiate a snapshot manually. A snapshot consists of a flight recording of all parameters that describe the system conditions. This includes information from five minutes before the event to one minute after the event. This strategy is applied to snapshots that are triggered immediately after key ON. However, a portion of the five minutes of data that occurred prior to the event that triggered this snapshot was actually captured prior to turning the key start switch OFF. This data may have been stored hours or days before the event that triggered the snapshot.

The VIMS has the capability of storing two sets of snapshot information. If a snapshot is in the process of being recorded and a second snapshot is triggered the second snapshot is ignored.

The snapshot is accessible only with the service tool.

Data Logger - The data logger captures all the machine parameters (channels) that are monitored by the VIMS. The data logger is recorded in real time at one second intervals. The operation of the data logger is similar to the snapshot. However, the data logger can not be triggered automatically. The manual triggering of the data logger can only be done by the service tool or the keypad. The logger can be started and stopped with a total recording time of 30 minutes.

The information in the data logger is accessible only with the service tool. The data logger can be reset by the service tool or the keypad.

Trends - Trend information consists of the minimums, maximums and averages of parameter data over time. Trend information is viewed with VIMSpc software. The trend information is displayed as a graph or the trend information is tabulated as columns of data. An example of trend information is the average brake temperature per hour. Trend information is recorded for predefined parameters for each machine. Trend information is recorded under the specified guidelines that are listed here:

  • All one hour continuous trends begin when the key start switch is turned to the ON position.

  • Trend data that is collected during a period less than one hour when the key start switch is turned to the OFF position is discarded.

  • Trend points are the average of each trend that was captured during the past hour. Each trend must meet the conditions that are set for that trend. A single trend point for the designated hour is calculated and stored when the measured trends are averaged over one hour.

The trend data point or the responsible failure mode identifier are stored according to the guidelines that are listed here:

  1. At least one Trend condition was met during at least one continuous hour.

  1. FMI 19 is stored or the actual FMI that was responsible for the condition that was not met for the entire hour is stored.

Trends are accessible only with the service tool.

Cumulative - Cumulative information is the number of occurrences (counts) of specific events. An example of cumulative information is total engine revolutions or total fuel consumption over the life of the machine or component. Cumulative information is recorded for a standard set of parameters. The parameters are defined in the configuration software for each machine. The onboard system collects life-time cumulatives with no need to reset. The situations that will cause an automatic resetting of the cumulatives are listed here:

  • New onboard software is flashed into the onboard memory.

Note: The term on board software describes the system (VIMS) and the model number of the machine.

  • A configuration is loaded with any changes to the methods of calculating and storing cumulative data. The change indicates that a correction has actually been made to the configuration or the VIMS electronic control module has just been installed from a different VIMS application. The new VIMS electronic control module may not recognize the methods of calculating and storing cumulative data that is used by the configuration.

  • The disconnect switch is in the OPEN position.

Resetting of cumulatives manually is not required. If the user desires, the cumulatives may be reset manually. The reset process clears all cumulatives. Because there is only one choice, cumulatives can not be reset individually. If a reset of cumulatives is requested, all the cumulatives will be reset.

Cumulatives are accessible only with the service tool.

Histograms - Histogram information records the history of a parameter since last reset. For example, a histogram of the engine speed would indicate the percentage of time that the engine operated within a defined speed limit (example 0-699, 700-1299, 1300-1699, 1700-2199, 2200-up) and the time interval (example 25 to 475 SMH or 1/1/99 to 2/2/99) of the data gathered. Histograms can be used to evaluate the range of operation for a parameter.

Histograms are accessible only with the service tool.

Related Support Material

VIMSpc User Manual, FEBJ0047

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